DCSIMG

Should heads roll when it snows?

THERE’S a good chance it could be snowing again today, before we move into milder weekend weather - and rain.

Opinion on just what’s going to happen seems divided, almost depending on which particular forecast you listen to.

As they say, you pays your money ....

But just imagine you are a headteacher, responsible for scores and scores of children and the staff who look after them .

Many of the latter travel in from miles around, such is the modern way. There are few Miss Reads about these days.

You’re also mindful of mums and dads who expect you to act in loco parentis while educating their offspring.

True, they shouldn’t just regard you as childminders, but they, too, have their own commitments during the day.

The weather’s closing in. Should you close your school?

Then, of course, there’s health and safety to bring into the equation. Oh yes, indeed.

In days gone by, if the heating failed, for instance, teachers just told the kids to fetch their coats and carried on .

Or if a child took a tumble while enjoying the snow in the playground, it was just a part of growing up.

But nowadays, thanks to our almost slavish adoption of all things American, a few wintry flakes and it’s “stay in your classrooms”.

The merest hint of a turned ankle and it’s off to the lawyers to claim compensation - no win, no fee, just like on the telly.

So, headteacher, it’s snowing: should you close your school?

As we report elsewhere, Monday’s snow and ice brought a range of responses to that very question.

Some schools were shut, some started late or finished early, and some were able to operate as normal.

Who was right and who was wrong? Which headteacher got 10 out of 10 for the decision they made?

The answer is simple. All of them.

If you’ve been paying attention, you’ll have hopefully realised that there are a hundred and one things to try to weigh up.

Some we haven’t even touched on.

But every head did their best. And isn’t that all you can ask?

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page