DCSIMG

One in the eye for link road champions?

Left to right: Michael Bernard, spokesman for BLINKRR (Bexhill Link Road Resistance) examines a medieval artefact with historian Nick Austin

Left to right: Michael Bernard, spokesman for BLINKRR (Bexhill Link Road Resistance) examines a medieval artefact with historian Nick Austin

A NEW pressure group born out of the Bexhill-Hastings Link Road controversy is going back 956 years to bolster its case against the new route.

BLINKRR (Bexhill Link Road Resistance) believes urgent consideration must be given to claims that the £100 million development could wreck a potential World Heritage Site.

This stems from a belief expressed by some historians that the infamous 1066 clash between Norman and Saxon, in which England’s King Harold was slain and invader William was crowned the Conqueror, took place not at Senlac Hill or Caldbec Hill, Battle, but in Combe Haven Valley.

This is the area across which the new four-mile mile link road, due to begin construction in January, is set to pass and which East Sussex County Council (ESCC) says will generate more than 3,000 jobs and up to 2,000 new homes while providing vital traffic relief for the A259 coast road.

Local historian Nick Austin and a team of amateur archaeologists have found various artefacts in Combe Haven Valley supporting the view that this is where the Battle of Hastings was actually fought.

Items include earthworks and ditches, a spear, a crossbow and helmet rings.

BLINKRR spokesman Michael Bernard said: “Our demand is that ESCC should immediately instruct the Battlefields Trust to investigate the site before further damage is inflicted. And why won’t local MPs Amber Rudd and Greg Barker ask Ed Vaizey, the minister for culture, to intercede?

“It needs carefully excavating by archaeologists, not road contractors with diggers and bulldozers.”

A county council spokesman said: “We’ve already been conducting archaeological surveys with professional contractors along the whole route of the link road in advance of main construction and haven’t uncovered any evidence to suggest the Battle of Hastings was fought on this site. The archaeological work does, however, provide us with an opportunity to understand more about the area’s heritage stretching back more than ten thousand years.”

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page