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Successful applicants for Oxford summer school

Bexhill College students Eleanor McDonald-Dick and Clover Donohue have been selected from thousands of applicants to attend a prestigious summer school at Oxford University.

The UNIQ Summer Schools aim to give the most promising students an insight into life at one of the world’s most respected universities. Eleanor will study Egyptology and Clover will study Medicine for a week in June/July.

Competition for places was intense, with 4,327 students applying for just 1,000 spots. Clover was one of only 40 students from in excess of 1,000 applicants to be accepted onto the medicine summer school.

Eleanor is currently studying AS Levels in Archaeology, Medieval History, English Language and Literature, Politics and an A2 Level in French.

She commented: “I was really pleased and excited when I got the offer. I received lots of support from College, with my form tutor helping with my personal statement and application.”

Clover was equally delighted to get her place: “I feel it will give me a real insight into what life is like at university. The application process was quite tough as I knew that I was competing against many others across the country for one of just a small number of places. The Science and Maths Section staff at the College were really helpful in giving me advice on what to include in my personal statement and how to structure it as I had never written one before.”

Both Bexhill College students will attend an intensive programme of lectures and seminars delivered by Oxford academics and will be mentored by current undergraduates. They will also attend workshops on interviews and personal statements, careers events and social activities.

Though excited at this valuable opportunity, both Clover and Eleanor are also looking ahead to when they will need to apply to University next year. After completing her A Levels Clover hopes to go on to study Medicine at Oxford, whilst Eleanor says she is hoping to go to Cambridge to read Anglo-Sa

xon Norse and Celtic Studies.

 

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