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VIPs gather to welcome new school facility

25/10/12- Opening of Sarson House, a residential annexe for St Mary's School, Bexhill. Bernard Sarson cutting the tape with Tessa Sambrook, Chair of Trustees for St Mary's School.

25/10/12- Opening of Sarson House, a residential annexe for St Mary's School, Bexhill. Bernard Sarson cutting the tape with Tessa Sambrook, Chair of Trustees for St Mary's School.

AN important new facility for St Mary’s Wrestwood school and college was opened in Dorset Road, Bexhill, last week.

To be known as Sarson House, after the founders of a trust created 90 years ago to care for and educate youngsters with severe communication disabilities, it occupies premises formerly used as a nursing home, Ashridge House.

Fittingly, the person chosen to declare the amenity open was Bernard Sarson, 89-year-old nephew of the founders, from Reading in Berkshire.He was welcomed by Tessa Sambrook, current chairman of the trustees.

Other VIPs present were Cllr Mrs Joy Hughes, chairman of Rother District Council, and Bexhill’s mayor, Cllr Mrs Joanne Gadd, together with trustees, governors and staff.

Sarson House is intended to provide care and independence learning for 18 college students. equipping them with vital skills for later life.

St Mary’s, recently renamed The Talking Trust to better reflect the work it does and to make it easier to contact, is a registered charity dedicated to educating and caring for young people between seven to 19 years of age, all of whom have complex special needs.

The Trust has a school (for ages seven to 16), a college (16-19) and is also involved in outreach work and assessments.

Mrs Sambrook told the assembled guests: “We’re delighted to announce this flagship facility.

“The flexibility of the accommodation allows for learning and therapy to be delivered through a student-centred approach.”

She added: “They will be able to develop skills through our unique waking curriculum which focuses on developing long-term independence for students with severe communication disabilities, many of whom also have physical and medical difficulties.”

 

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