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No power for two days at Christmas

‘The worst Christmas weather for many years’ left many homes on Little Common Road facing a miserable Christmas with power cut from Christmas Eve morning until early afternoon on Christmas day.

A spokesman for UK Power Network, who are responsible for the supply of electricity, said in Little Common Road, supplies were lost to 24 customers at about 11am on December 24 but workload meant they were unable to get an engineer on site until noon on Christmas day when repairs were carried out and customers had supplies reinstated at about 1.30pm.

The spokesman said as storms battered most of the UK the loss in local power supplies was the result of fallen trees and rain affecting underground cables, he said:”The worst Christmas weather for many years caused significant damage to our power lines throughout the South East, producing the same level of faults on our electricity network that we would normally experience in six weeks in just a few hours. Approximately 300,000 properties had a power cut due to the Christmas storm but most were restored quickly. Engineers repaired storm damage at hundreds of locations.

“Many power lines were brought down by fallen trees and torrential rain caused problems with underground cables, including ones that serve customers in Little Common Road, Bexhill.

“We understand what a cold and uncomfortable Christmas it must have been for these customers and extend our sincere apologies to them and any other customers who spent several days without electricity over Christmas.”

Those affected by the power cuts are eligible for a goodwill payment, the spokesman said: “ We have written to all customers who are eligible for payments. As a gesture of goodwill, UK Power Networks has decided to boost the industry standard payment from £27 to £75 for customers who were without power at any time on Christmas Day. Additional payments will be made to any customers off supply for longer periods up to a maximum of £432.”

 

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