Hastings Herring Fair returns with two days of freee entertainment and local produce

Herring Fair, Hastings.''L-R Peter Chowney (Leader of Hastings Council), Judy Rogers (Mayor of Hastings), Cllr Kim Forward and Sonny Elliot owner of Rock A Nore Fisheries. SUS-171118-140529001
Herring Fair, Hastings.''L-R Peter Chowney (Leader of Hastings Council), Judy Rogers (Mayor of Hastings), Cllr Kim Forward and Sonny Elliot owner of Rock A Nore Fisheries. SUS-171118-140529001

This year’s Hastings Herring Fair takes place on Saturday 17 and Sunday 18 November at the Stade Open Space

The Herring Fair is a free event held undercover on the Stade, Hastings Old Town. The fair includes music, cooking demos, beer, kids’ activities and a ceilidh.

The Hastings fishing fleet have been catching herring off local shores since at least the 1600s, when records began.

Come and celebrate the undervalued ‘silver darling of the sea’ in its many wondrous forms, from bloaters to buckling and kippers, as well as other seasonal local fish.

SEE ALSO: Experts predict a freezing winter
As well as delicious fish dishes, stalls will be selling various local produce, wines, ciders, hot food, vegetarian options and sweet delights. There will also be a bar run by the First in Last Out pub and microbrewery.

Visitors can learn to create seasonal fish dishes from professionals with cooking demos in Classroom on the Coast from the famous Billingsgate Seafood Training School; St Leonards restaurant The Thai House and cookery consultant and author, Silla Bjerrum.

There will be children’s sea-themed craft activities and face painting in the Stade Hall, traditional net making by Hastings fishermen in the marquee, and a fantastic music line up with a folky flavour.

The Fair will come to a lively close on Sunday afternoon, from 3pm, mwhen the 13 piece barn dance band Sugarloaf, will get people up and dancing.

The tradition of Blessing the Nets will take place on Sunday 18 at 12pm. Visit www.visit1066country.com for full details.

See also: Potholes are costing us millions