Paul completes epic 104-mile race

Paul McCleery during the 104-mile Arc of Attrition race. Picture by No Limits Photography
Paul McCleery during the 104-mile Arc of Attrition race. Picture by No Limits Photography

Personal trainer Paul McCleery successfully completed the 104-mile Arc of Attrition race in Cornwall.

The former Hastings Athletic Club member, who is now with Bexhill Runners & Triathletes, finished 28th overall and 13th in age group in a time of 30 hours and 59 minutes.

Paul McCleery after finishing the 104-mile Arc of Attrition race. Picture by No Limits Photography

Paul McCleery after finishing the 104-mile Arc of Attrition race. Picture by No Limits Photography

The race started at midday on Friday with 180 starters and just 66 made it to the end within the 36-hour cut-off.

See also: * Paul McCleery completes epic 600-mile series of races
* Tireless Paul completes 100-mile race in personal best time
* Hastings talent crowned county champion

The Arc of Attrition starts from Coverack on the Cornish coast and finishes in Porthtowan, passing Penzance, Land’s End and St Ives.

With 4,000m of ascent, it always provides beautiful scenery, but the toughest of conditions. This year was no different with heavy snowfall on Thursday night, 30-40mph winds, hail, sleet, snow, rain and minus temperatures.

Three other Bexhill Runners & Triathletes members, Paul Heywood, Sharon Dickson and Paula Chase, competed in the ARC 50-mile race, which is virtually a double marathon, along the same coastal path.

Heywood had to drop out due to injury, but not before he had completed 33 gruelling miles. Dickson finished eighth female in 13 hours and 46 minutes while, despite injury in 2018, Paula also completed the course and described the event as the hardest thing she has ever done.

McCleery competes in a number of endurance events. Last year he completed a remarkable 600-mile running challenge, running four 100-mile and four 50-mile races.

During that challenge he completed 140 hours of running, burned 65,802 calories and climbed 56,500ft of ascent (twice the height of Mount Everest).